Tag Archive: running the race



“Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us.” -Hebrews 12:1

Verse one begins one of my favorite chapters in all of scripture, Hebrews Chapter 12. Despite the subject matter of discipline and judgement, which can have the tendency to make people cringe, especially while they live in sin, it is one of the most beautiful passages in all the bible. Of course, that’s a personal conclusion and not made from any independent study. It could have something to do with the fact that this chapter is the one that led me to the Lord. Thus, it has a deep personal significance for me.

Nobody knows without a doubt who wrote Hebrews, for the writer does not identify himself. Though it was accredited to Paul in the past, he seems an unlikely candidate, due to the style of writing differing from his. For instance, Paul identifies himself in his letters, but Hebrews is void of any such attribution. Yet, there are a couple candidates, and it appears that whoever the writer of Hebrews was, was indeed a close friend of Paul’s. Verse one suggests this by presenting the allegory of an athlete, which Paul was a frequent user of. Paul’s metaphors found in his other books and the allegory used by Hebrews’ author are so similar, it seems logical that the writer knew Paul intimately. Scholars have narrowed authorship down to two possibilities, Apollos or Barnabas. Whoever it was, they wrote a book equal to that of Paul and of vast importance for any Christian. Not only does Chapter 12 remain one of my favorite sections of scripture, Hebrews remains my favorite book outside the gospels. I recommend it to anyone engaged in an in depth bible study.

"St. Jerome in His Study," by Albrecht Duerer. engraving c. 1514

Verse one brings to mind the familiar image of an athlete. The cloud of witnesses, refers to great holy men of the past who gave all for their love of the Lord. Their faith led them to obedience and by that obedience, the Lord’s will became known on earth. These witnesses prepared the way for the Lord Jesus Christ so that by and through Him we may be reconciled unto God.

Sir Isaac Newton and earlier John of Salisbury brought into the common lexicon the phrase, “standing on the shoulders of giants.” What is meant by this is that progress is made by carrying on those things pioneered by what and who has came before. It is no different in Christianity. The Kingdom of God is not meant to be stagnant, but rather to be forwarded by those who belong to Christ Jesus. Thus, because we are made aware of this by the Spirit and the Word, we are called to remove those hindrances and stumbling blocks that prevent us from doing our part in moving the Kingdom forward.

Sir Isaac Newton

Christ opened up the Kingdom to and for us that we may be admitted by faith rather than by works and He being human for a season, can readily identify with man, for He was tempted by sin as we all are, yet remained in perfect obedience to the Father. In fact, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to say He must have been tempted beyond all men, due to Satan’s awareness of His true nature.

We have a merciful God who doesn’t just reside in the heavens, but became man, and experienced all the grotesqueness of sin. At the same time He underwent the struggle we all encounter, but was victorious. Amazing as it is, we have a God who knows what it’s like to fight against sin and thus verses that hint at how easily sin overtakes us are not infrequent in the scripture. This should give us hope and we should praise God for this, that He can identify with even the most lowly of us.

Again, the athlete allegory is mentioned at the close of the verse. “Let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us.” Christians aren’t called to just skate by going to church just on Sunday’s and Easter, but to take an active role in the mission God has set out for them. This requires effort and perseverance, for it will not always be easy, for sometimes we will be ahead and other times behind. Yet, we are called to keep our eyes on the goal, and the prize that we will receive when we cross that finish line.

In life, we often convince ourselves that we have to run from something, like a bad circumstance or sin, but we rarely tell ourselves that we need to run towards something. In life, you are always running towards something. Don’t focus on what you are running from, for when running a race, a participant is discouraged from looking back, lest they slow down and stumble. Keep you eyes forward along the track that the Lord has set out for you and the magnificent finish line that marks the end, for it is there we will gather with Christ and all the other racers in the glorious winners circle that is promised to those who run and finish the race.


“Through Him we received grace and apostleship to call all the Gentiles to the obedience that comes from faith for His name’s sake.” -Romans 1:5

One of the paradoxes frequently discussed amongst those in the Christian faith is the relationship between faith and obedience. We find the Bible does place importance on both faith and deeds, though it also tells us our deeds are meaningless, in that we cannot acquire salvation from them and of our own accord.

We, as Christians, more often than not understand this conceptually, for it is a cornerstone of our faith in Christ. As it is said, if it was possible to become righteous because of deeds, then Christ need not have come in the first place (See my note on Galatians 2:21, “On Righteousness by The Law”).

It’s unfortunate, but even us Christians, me included, continue to lose our way, and each and everyone of us can think of a time where we have backslid spiritually. When I read this verse I feel it is not only important for me, but all the Body of Christ. In fact, I have dealt with this very thing recently and perhaps anyone reading this can relate.

I had backslid quite a bit, from what I would consider the most pious time in my life. The scripture tells us of the sin that so easily entangles (See my note on Hebrews 12:1, “On Running The Race”), and more or less, I threw myself headlong into that thorny hedge of intertwined sin and darkness.

The thorns pierced deep into my bone, and once more I was caught in a life of sin. My heart, however, as corrupt as it was, ached for God to pull me out of that hedge. I knew the Lord would love nothing more, for I had a very pious relationship with Him in the past. So I desired to come back to the relationship I once had with Him, and thought I could get that by obeying His statutes. Imagine my disappointment when I found it was doing no good for my relationship with Him, nor was it pulling me out of sin, for I found the sin still abundant in my life despite my disgust with it.


It took me a while, but I eventually was shown I had it all backwards. Even the most taught of us in the faith, make this very mistake. We find ourselves in a place, much like where I was at, and we think to have a relationship with the Lord, we must clean up to approach Him. Yet as Paul touches on here, it is faith that brings us to the Lord and by that relationship, it’s manifest in our deeds.

Christ Himself said that if we love Him, we will obey Him (See my note on John 14:23, “On Love: A Motive For Obedience”). This doesn’t necessarily mean that every sin negates the love we have for Him, though it does show the imperfection of our love, but rather, that loving Him is a necessary condition for obedience. Thus, despite my shame of backsliding, I took some simple steps to improve my relationship with the Lord. I made the assumption He still wanted to hear from me, I confessed, prayed and spent time in the word.


Honestly, it was rather uncomfortable at first. Really uncomfortable. Yet, the relationship has seemed to grow abundantly stronger in a short amount of time, simply because I looked to God, not obedience, to bring me closer. This is a lesson that is clear when we come to Christ, but somehow it gets lost among even the most devout of us. We don’t need to become perfect to come to the Lord or to have a relationship with Him.

So, if you have sin in your life that is tearing you apart from God, realize you have been apart from God already, hence the disobedience. Yet, take heart if you recognize it, for that is the Almighty Himself calling you back. Humble yourself and strive to develop your relationship with God and the obedience in which the Christian finds peace and contentment will surely follow.

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