Tag Archive: Paradox



“Then go quickly and tell His disciples: ‘He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him.’ Now I have told you.” -Matthew 28:7

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In my previous entry (see my note concerning 1 Corinthians 15:3-8, “On a Brief Overview of The ‘Historical Christ,’ Contradiction, and Biblical Omission”), I discussed some of the paradox among the Gospels concerning the events surrounding the resurrection of Jesus Christ. It was my hypothesis that all the Gospels meshed together to form a perfect narrative. One of the assumed contradictions, has to do with Mary Magdalene and her companions encounter with an angel outside the tomb. Yet, in Luke 24:4, it says there are two angels and they speak to the women inside the tomb. However, when we read Mark 16:5, only one angel inside the tomb is recounted.

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Many theories concerning the reconciliation of these encounters have been offered, including that there are multiple groups of women, or that Mary Magdalene ran to tell the disciples after being spoken to by the angel outside the tomb, who sat upon the stone that had been rolled away. She is at times said not to enter the tomb until later. Yet, I concluded after some prayer for illumination, that the angel on the outside spoke to them and they entered the tomb where they encountered at least one more heavenly being. As for how many angels were in the tomb, I address that in my previous entry as well.

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The Lord led me back to this verse, and I found some more evidence suggesting that my interpretation, at least in this case, may be correct. Let us closely examine the angel’s words. In Chapter 28, Verse 6, of Matthew, the angel says:

“He (Christ) is not here; He has risen, just as He said. Come and see the place where He lay.”

To me this sounded like an invite to see the evidence which was visible within the tomb, but my cited indications advocating this truth essentially ended there. However, the beginning of Verse 7 may contain a bit more evidence. It may not be earth shattering, but adds a little extra confirmation that my interpretation concerning this event may be correct. When we look at Verse 7, it begins with the word, “then.”

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"Angel Seated on The Stone of The Tomb," by James Tissot. watercolor, c. 1886

What this means to me is that the angel in reality did invite or command them into the tomb, in order that they may “see the place where He lay.” The term, “then,” suggests further instructions by the angel, that immediately after viewing the tomb they should embark on and hasten to tell the disciples, for Christ is said to be going ahead of them. When they finally reach the disciples, after seeing Jesus themselves, they tell them of the empty tomb. They were disbelieved, but regardless Peter and John ran to the tomb to investigate Mary’s claim. If Mary and her companions did not yet enter the tomb, as some believe, then only their encounter with the angel would have been mentioned along with their encounter with Christ. They would’ve lacked seeing the evidence with their own eyes that His body was missing.

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"Saint Peter and Saint John Run to the Sepulchre," by James Tissot. watercolor, c. 1884-1896

As Christ had first went into Galilee ahead of the women, so too does He go ahead of us, preparing a place for us in His Father’s house, and when we get there, we will likewise see Him. Though Christ had a new glorified body, the Firstfruit (see my note concerning 1 Corinthians 15:20-23, “On The Chaos of Reason, The Firstfruit, and The Transfiguration”), we see that this body isn’t bound by physical laws, or even death. Christ was able to move throughout Israel at His own will, without traveling in the manner of a mortal man. He would simply appear. This gives us some clues into what our new bodies will be like once they are granted unto us, through faith in the Son.

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Stained Glass Window in The Duomo, Florence, by Paolo Uccello. c. 1443

I would like to thank the Lord that when we come to Him and pray over His word, He illuminates the Scriptures beyond our mere mortal understanding. His faithfulness in answering such prayers is truly amazing. Thank you Lord for revealing the mysteries of your Word, unto the likes of me, a disobedient sinner. May this glorify You, and may You put a hedge of protection around my heart, that in your revelations I may not grow prideful, but rather give you the praise and see myself in sober judgement always. May your name be revered, blessed, and worshipped for all eternity. In Christ’s name, Amen.

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"Resurrection of Christ and the Women at the Tomb," by Fra Angelico. fresco, c. 1440

Thank you Lord for blessing me with Terie, a fantastic “Editor-in-Chief.” 🙂

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“Looking at His disciples, He said: ‘Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the Kingdom of God. 21Blessed are you who hunger now, for you will be satisfied. Blessed are you who weep now, for you will laugh. 22Blessed are you when people hate you, when they exclude you and insult you and reject your name as evil, because of the Son of Man. 23Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their ancestors treated the prophets. 24But woe to you who are rich, for you have already received your comfort. 25Woe to you who are well fed now, for you will go hungry. Woe to you who laugh now, for you will mourn and weep. 26Woe to you when everyone speaks well of you, for that is how their ancestors treated the false prophets.'”

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If one has ears to hear, let him hear. Many verses containing the word of Christ, and indeed throughout the Bible, contain some passages that may look curious or downright scary at first glance. Furthermore, they may seem to contradict the rest of what scripture says, though with closer inspection this isn’t the case. Although this section provided me with a lot of comfort, it also alarmed me somewhat.

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It seemed to say that to follow Christ I had to be in a constant state of misery. This obviously isn’t the case. When we look at the example of Paul for instance, we find that he was content no matter what he lacked or what hardships he faced. As he says in 2 Corinthians 12:10, “I delight in weakness, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions in difficulties.” Instead, he had a faith that produced a harvest of contentment and joy no matter what the circumstance. So what is Jesus saying here? Does it contradict the joy that Paul, the apostles, and we have? Not at all, for even Christ Himself tells us to rejoice and “leap for joy” in verse 23.

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"San Paolo," by Pompeo Batoni. oil on canvas, c. 1742

2 Corinthians 5:4 says:

“For while we are in this tent, we groan and are burdened, because we do not wish to be unclothed but to be clothed with our heavenly dwelling, so that what is mortal may be swallowed up by life.” (See my Note, “On Being Swallowed up by Life”)

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Paul both groans and delights. Using these scriptures, what Christ really means in the aforementioned passage in Luke becomes clear. A Christian is not supposed to be void of laughter, or even prosperity. A Christian is warned in Romans 12:2 to, “not conform to the pattern of this world.” Though we are in the world we are not of the world, for now our eyes are focused on Christ. Our contentment rests not in the things of this world, and those activities and materials man chases after to pacify himself, but rather it rests on Christ. This being the case we ache, or groan, to be in our heavenly dwelling and away from the body and it’s meaningless desires, for we know the things of God are not momentary like those things people find “contentment” in within the world, but rather everlasting and more glorious than anything currently made up of the physical or based upon it.

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We should not find contentment or delight in mere things, for as all physicality will disappear to be renewed, so will those things based upon material. In addition, our happiness should not be dependent on man. If one constantly chases after approval of man, then he shifts more often than shadows. Such a person is deceptive to both himself and those he seeks approval from. Contentment in this is just as fleeting, for man’s support will vanish from you at anytime. The reliability of superficial friendships is a farce and often self-serving, ironically to both parties. As it is said, no one can serve two masters.

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Serve God, fix your eyes on His son and you will gain an eternal contentment and joy that is based on the everlasting, not given to decay and abandonment like the things of this world, but instead He who promises to carry you through all things. As Christians we will have heartache, hardships, and insults, but lo, how fleeting these things are, for when the physical as we know it now ceases to be, weeping will be transformed into joy, hunger to satisfaction, exclusion to inclusion, and a lack of possession into great riches within the Kingdom. To this we await and look forward to.

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“First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you, because your faith is being reported all over the world.” -Romans 1:8

It is a common argument among non-believers to cite that the Bible cannot be regarded as trustworthy due to how many people were responsible for its authorship. Current estimates state that the number of authors number somewhere around 40. According to their argument this necessarily means that the Bible is unreliable. I find this not to be the case at all. Rather, the more people the Bible had write it, due to the lack of contradiction, adds to its credibility. In fact, Hollywood can scarcely produce a sequel without some contradiction being evident in the overall story line. Sometimes these inconsistencies even occur in the same film. So with approximately 40 authors, the Bible should be full of such irreconcilable contradictions, but we find this not to be the case. If it was just written by man and not God-breathed, than we could indeed expect it to be. Therefore, it is clearly seen that God directed the pen of the authors of Scripture.

Note Mysterious, Unexplained T-Shirt Color Shift

This verse not only contains an exhortation to the church in Rome, but also shows us the important role Christ fills between us and the Father. Romans 1:8 states, “First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you.” The statement, “through Jesus Christ,” shows us that Christ serves as the mediator between us and God, which is a point echoed in 1 Timothy 2:5, “For there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the man Jesus Christ.”

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It’s an important thing to remember when reading the letters of Paul is that they are to specific churches. I only bring this up because it seems to be easily forgotten by some who find themselves particularly distracted by paradox. There is certainly plenty of paradox in the letters of Paul, but one would be wise to look to whom it is Paul is writing. Although the concrete truths of the gospel of Christ are contained throughout Paul’s letters, it’s helpful to remember Paul is also writing to a specific church and place, each with their own struggles, hindrances, and scope of focus.

Concerning the lack of technology in those times, one cannot help be amazed at how in touch Paul was with all the churches throughout the Mediterranean. Although he sometimes couldn’t visit due to God’s will for him to be elsewhere, he nevertheless was keenly aware of each church’s state and their trials. Again, with the lack of communication and technology, this in itself seems almost miraculous and reflection on this may provide a some perspective concerning church leadership.

Romans 1:2, “On Mind and Faith”


“The Gospel He promised beforehand through His Prophets in The Holy Scriptures.” -Romans 1:2


Often times even Christians themselves along with unbelievers differentiate between both the Old and New Testaments in a way that belittles the narrative as a whole. The reason why, I feel, is the somewhat troubling paradoxes that arise when juxtaposing the two. Yet, when one approaches such paradox on a individual basis we can plainly see the resolution of those supposed contradictions. Each scripture, no matter how mundane it seems, contains untold depths of wisdom and knowledge, from the long lists of genealogies to the regulations which the Almighty beseeched His people, the Jews, to follow. The gospel itself is foreshadowed in the events of the Old Testament, both explicitly and implicitly, and its fulfillment within the New Testament gives insight into that infinite glory that is the Lord’s and His alone.

The letters of Paul are important in that he addresses the world, a world increasingly relying on science, philosophy and reason. Today’s world is much of the same, but has advanced in the liberal arts and sciences to such a degree that there seems no room for God in academia. Yet, just as Paul reasoned with the Romans, we too can use reason to make a case for God, even in these scientific laden times, God’s glory is apparent.

Where does faith fit in? There is a reconciliation between faith and reason which Paul, the first, in my view, Christian philosopher, understood and preached. This does not negate the need for faith, indeed, I feel those who have a pure faith without question to be revered above all else in my view, but the wonderful thing is God in His perfection did not leave our mind to want and doubt, but put clear answers out there, in the scriptures and in the world. Glory be to Him forever and ever. Amen.

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