Tag Archive: Cosmos



“I am obligated both to Greeks and non-Greeks, both to the wise and the foolish.” -Romans 1:4

1 Corinthians 1:22 – “Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom.”

Much of philosophy, the liberal arts, and indeed the western tradition can be credited to the Greeks. Great philosophers like Aristotle and Plato offered up theories about the cosmos, thought and metaphysics that are still with us today. In fact, Greek philosophers were the first to suggest a theory of evolution, though it wouldn’t become known as “evolution,” until Darwin. A couple philosophers known for writing theories similar to Darwin’s are, Thales and Lucretius, some 2,300 years prior.

Now it is true that Greeks, especially the Athenians, were considered very intelligent, though their philosophical writing as a whole is made up of treatises both for and against the existence of God. Yet, their own personal belief structure was wildly polytheistic, as were the Romans.

Paul’s meaning in verse 14 is two fold, at least. First and foremost, the message is that Paul’s mission is to preach the gospel to the Gentiles. The second is, because he mentioned the Greeks specifically, that he is to preach the gospel to not only the wise, but the foolish as well. Though, it should be mentioned what’s wise and what’s foolish differ much in the eyes of the Lord than before the eyes of the world.

I myself am a student of philosophy, but I read and present it through a Christian perspective. I agree this probably isn’t for everyone, if not for any more reason than the angry writings you have to read blatantly attacking God and those who follow Him. However, I am analytical by nature and delve deeply into topics, sometimes, honestly, too much. Yet, though it has fault, I believe it is also good in some ways, and again, I utmost try and use my analytical thought to glorify God.


That being said this verse strikes me in another way. Paul and the Romans to whom he was writing would have been more than aware of the significance of this, and not of just the importance of preaching to Gentiles, which was made already apparent by Paul writing them in the first place, but that he was obligated to preach to the most brilliant minds of the time.

Now, I have heard much concerning the debate of how much the mind has a part to play in our relationship with God. Let me just say, so nobody gets the wrong impression, I consider the fact I have all these questions, and that I always have had to seek an answer, to be a lower spiritual condition, if you will, than pure faith. Indeed, it’s been something I have been accused of lacking, simply because I ask questions. Much to their credit, those who have told me this, their motives are pure and feel that it can be a stumbling block, so I don’t regard such criticisms to rude in anyway, though I do disagree that its an absolute stumbling block.

It comes down to a kind of dualism. The freedom our Lord gave us was opportunity for man to either use things the right way, or the wrong way. The scriptures aren’t opposed to the mind. I feel Paul was an amazing example of this, for when one reads his epistles, and one even has a little philosophical background, it’s apparent that Paul was exercising his spirit and his mind. The scriptures give examples of how he “reasoned,” with Gentiles concerning the Lord’s existence and the Gospel. God does not do anything arbitrarily. He gave us a mind for a reason and though I hold those who have a faith beyond questions to a higher esteem than myself, I feel there is a right way to exercise the mind pursuing God that is not only beneficial for my relationship with the Lord, but to those the Lord may place in my path. May He be Praised.

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“For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities – His eternal power and divine nature – have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse. -Romans 1:20


It’s often that a Christian is approached by a non-believer challenging them to prove the existence of God. Usually, it’s not because they truly want to know, but rather it pleases them to see a Christian get tripped up when trying to answer them. This is apparent when one has an answer for them and their response is one of anger.


In an attempt not to go too far off the subject, the question makes the supposition that physicality and existence are not proof enough. Thus, it’s hard to find a proof, empirical proof, that would sway this hypothetical challenger.

The Bible, the very Word of God, is not silent when it comes to this issue, of not just proof of God’s existence being represented in nature, but also of who He is, that is His very being. So why the apparent contradiction in the verse,what are those qualities that are both invisible, but also clearly seen? The verse tells us it’s his divinity and eternal power that are made evident in the creation.


Truth is, that things like power and dominion cannot be understood unless its effect is manifest elsewhere. A king in his own being though granted power is powerless of his own accord unless it is exercised. It is by action that one can empirically determine the traits that reside in mere people. The bible declares that you can know a person due to the fruit he bares (Matthew 7:16, see my note, “On Judging Man and Scepticism”). You can see those qualities in a human being that otherwise may not be seen by his influence on the world around him.


It is the same with God, we gain valuable insight into not only His existence, but also His nature, that is who He is.

Let us suppose for a moment that you want to paint a picture, write a book, some poetry, or a piece of music. Like it or not, whether your a fan of allegory and it is conscious or not, you cannot help but include a piece of yourself in what you create. It may not be exact, but a person can be going through an art gallery and if they have eyes to see can tell quite a bit about the artist by the mere composition alone.


Likewise, God put a piece of Himself in everything, but if you have eyes to see, you can see God even in the most mundane of things. The fact the scriptures confront us with is that this truth is so obvious that no man, none, will be without excuse.

There is no spontaneity concerning something that is created, so to believe such is a contradiction according to Samuel Clark. We see things only coming into being through causality and to suppose at the very beginning there was nothing suggests a contradiction that cannot be resolved. So not just existence itself, but the particulars that make up the cosmos are great places to look if anyone ever wants to see God, for He, among other things, is both obvious and apparent.

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